“Ships, towers, domes, theatres and temples” — a voyage up and down the Thames

Crossing the Thames to Greenwich in a cablecar.

Crossing the Thames to Greenwich in a cablecar.

The south shore entrance to the Greenwich Thames tunnel constructed in 1902. Not the 1869 tunnel of Paul Marlowe's story "The Mudmen of Tower Tunnel", obviously, but the original Tower Tunnel entrances were destroyed in the 1920's (north) and 1990's (south), and I didn't photograph their replacements.

The south shore entrance to the Greenwich Thames tunnel constructed in 1902. Not the 1869 tunnel of Paul Marlowe’s story “The Mudmen of Tower Tunnel”, obviously, but the original Tower Tunnel entrances were destroyed in the 1920’s (north) and 1990’s (south), and I didn’t photograph their replacements.

A tugboat and barges heading upriver. The Thames is still a working river.

A tugboat and barges heading upriver. The Thames is still a working river.

View of the Tower through a window, blurrily, heading upriver.

View of the Tower through a window, blurrily, heading upriver.

"Entrance to Traitors' Gate" - watergate built by Edward I.

“Entrance to Traitors’ Gate” – watergate built by Edward I.

A better view of the Tower. I had an outside seat heading down to Greenwich after my day at the British Museum.

A better view of the Tower. I had an outside seat heading down to Greenwich after my day at the British Museum.

Approaching Tower Bridge, heading upriver to the Embankment.

Approaching Tower Bridge, heading upriver to the Embankment.

Passing under Tower Bridge on a Thames Clipper river bus.

Passing under Tower Bridge on a Thames Clipper river bus.

Looking back upriver at Tower Bridge, heading down to Greenwich.  The river buses are catamarans; at one point they announced, "This vessel will now travel at speed." And it did. I do like messing about in boats, even as a passenger.

Looking back upriver at Tower Bridge, heading down to Greenwich. The river buses are catamarans; at one point they announced, “This vessel will now travel at speed.” And it did. I do like messing about in boats, even as a passenger.

A black and white treatment of the same scene, aiming for that sharp "old postcard" look.

A black and white treatment of the same scene, aiming for that sharp “old postcard” look.

Thames sailing barges, I think, but sadly, not under sail. I used the sailing barge in an as-yet-unpublished story.

Thames sailing barges, I think, but sadly, not under sail. I used the sailing barge in an as-yet-unpublished story.

A view of the famous dome of St. Paul's Cathedral from the Thames.

A view of the famous dome of St. Paul’s Cathedral from the Thames.

A second view of St. Paul's from a Thames Clipper catamaran, this one without so much Thames-smeared glass in the way.

A second view of St. Paul’s from a Thames Clipper catamaran, this one without so much Thames-smeared glass in the way.

Cleopatra's Needle. Actually from the time of Thutmose III (1479-1425 B.C.E.) -- Hatshepsut's successor.

Cleopatra’s Needle. Actually from the time of Thutmose III (1479-1425 B.C.E.) — Hatshepsut’s successor.

A detail of the embankment of the Thames -- a very canalized river through London, but I did see some mudflats down towards Greenwich and the Docklands.

A detail of the embankment of the Thames — “… the charter’d Thames does flow” — a very canalized river through London, but I did see some mudflats down towards Greenwich and the Docklands.

Westminster and the Elizabeth Tower from the Thames.

Westminster and the Elizabeth Tower from the Thames.

On shore – a view of Westminster Bridge. Wordsworth’s “Composed Upon Westminster Bridge” gave me my title for this gallery.

Advertisements

About K.V. Johansen

The author of Blackdog, The Leopard, The Lady, and Gods of Nabban, epic fantasies from Pyr, I also write for teens and children, including the "Torrie", "Warlocks of Talverdin", and "Cassandra Virus" series, and the "Pippin and Mabel" picture books, as well as a couple of short story collections and two works of adult literary criticism on the history of children's fantasy literature. I have a Master's degree in Mediaeval Studies, and read a lot of fantasy, science fiction, and history. Blog at thewildforest.wordpress.com
Gallery | This entry was posted in Loncon 3, Photos, sf conventions and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to “Ships, towers, domes, theatres and temples” — a voyage up and down the Thames

  1. Paul Weimer says:

    Thanks! I didn’t ever get on the water this trip and now I see what I was missing. A *lot*

    • KV Johansen says:

      It was really the best way to get to know the shape of the city. I had hoped to make my Kew expedition by river bus too, but they make fewer trips so far up, and the timing wasn’t right for me. Next time … (she said wistfully). Here’s Kipling on what that might have been like: “​Twenty bridges from Tower to Kew – / (Twenty bridges or twenty-two) – / Wanted to know what the River knew, / For they were young, and the Thames was old / And this is the tale that River told…”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s